Event Announcement: Academic Works Posting Party at John Jay College

The Lloyd Sealy Library and the Office for the Advancement of Research at John Jay College invite you to an Academic Works posting party. Tuesday May 31, 1-3, in the Library classroom.  Come learn how CUNY’s institutional repository, Academic Works, can help maximize your research impact and your rights as an author. We will demonstrate how to post your work to CUNY’s Academic Works and chat about copyright and author rights over cookies and coffee.

Schedule
1:00  – 1:30  Formal presentation
1:30 – 3:00  Hands-on practice – post your own files to Academic Works using our computers

If you cannot attend our half hour presentation, please do feel free to drop by at any time from 1:30 to 3 for the hands-on session.  Bring your electronic files and we will post them together.  We welcome pdfs of published articles, conference presentations in PowerPoint or other form, book chapters, etc.

We will have coffee and cookies. Please RSVP to Ellen Sexton (Lloyd Sealy Library) so we get the quantities right.

Event Announcement: Open Access in Latin America & the Case of CLACSO-REDALYC

The LACUNY Scholarly Communications Round Table and METRO’s OPEN SIG present an opportunity to hear from leaders of the Latin American OA movement about what’s happening in Iberoamerica and their view on global OA.

Dr. Dominique Babini & Dr. Arianna Becerril will talk about the new partnership between between CLACSO and Redalyc.org (www.clacso.redalyc.org) to further efforts to bring Latin American open access resources together. CLACSO-REDALYC provides APC-free OA social science journals from Iberoamerican countries with a platform for visibility, open access, indexing and indicators for authors, institutions, and countries. The platform already has 793 peer-reviewed journals with 294,437 articles in open access.

Our speakers will be participating remotely via webinar. We’ve arranged an in-person viewing at METRO and we hope you’ll join us there! If you wish to join via webinar, there are limited ”seats” so be sure to register in advance, and please check with colleagues in your organization to arrange participating together.

Open Access in Latin America & the Case of CLACSO-REDALYC
Tuesday, May 31, 2016
4 p.m. – 6 p.m.
Event Description and registration: http://metro.org/events/753/

About the Presenters:

Dominique Babini (Argentina) is coordinator of open access scholarly communications projects, research and advocacy at CLACSO, a network of 432 research institutions in 26 countries, mainly in Latin America. Open access scholarly communications researcher at the University of Buenos Aires. Latin America contributor at UNESCO´s Global Open Access Portal, and member of the Experts Committee of the Argentine National System of Digital Repositories; Doctorate in political science and postgraduate in information science.

Arianna Becerril is co-founder and director of technology and innovation at Redalyc. She is also a PhD candidate in Computer Science at the Tecnologico de Monterrey in Mexico, and a professor and researcher on the Faculty of Political and Social Sciences at the Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México, where her research addresses bibliometrics, design and development of metadata repositories, open access and interoperability standards. Becerril is a member of the International Advisory Board of the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) and co-founder of Red Mexicana de Repositorios Institucionales (REMERI).

This is the first event in the Global Open Access Webinar Series jointly sponsored by METROs OPEN SIG and LACUNY Scholarly Communications Round Table.

Art History Pedagogy and Practice launches in Digital Commons

Art History Teaching Resources (AHTR), in partnership with the Office of Library Services, is excited to announce the launch of Art History Pedagogy and Practice (AHPP) on Academic Works’ Digital Commons platform. Published by AHTR, a practitioner-led open educational resource for educators who address art history, visual, and material culture, AHPP is the first academic journal dedicated to the scholarship of teaching and learning in art history (SoTL-AH). The result of a two year initiative, AHPP responds to a long-standing need to advance, collect, disseminate, and demonstrate pedagogical research specific to the discipline. The CFP  for the inaugural issue, forthcoming in Fall 2016, is available on the AHTR website.

SoTL in Art History

AHPP results from a two year initiative that sought to examine the ways in which art historians devote time, effort, and energy to classroom teaching, curriculum development, and student engagement. Generously funded by the Samuel H. Kress Foundation, AHTR began preliminary research in 2015, which included a field-wide survey conducted by Randi Korn and Associates and a literature review assessing existing pedagogical scholarship in art history. These findings were synthesized in a White Paper  that demonstrated the need for SoTL-AH to be acknowledged as a legitimate area of intellectual inquiry by the institutions and communities encompassing academic art history. As a peer-reviewed journal devoted to SoTL-AH, AHPP will facilitate this process by providing scholars a forum to share research on pedagogical topics, and by encouraging further academic investigation and discourse around teaching and learning in art history

AHTR

AHPP builds on the success of AHTR as a platform to exchange ideas related to pedagogy in art history.  Founded on dual goals to raise the value of the academic labor of teaching and to provide peer support across ranks of tenured, tenure-track, and contingent instructors, AHTR began as a collaboration between Michelle Millar Fisher at the Graduate Center and Karen Shelby at Baruch College in 2011. Fisher, then a Graduate Teaching Fellow with a background in museum education, and Shelby, then an Assistant Professor of Art History, organized meetings where colleagues shared teaching materials and experiences. These gatherings suggested potential for a digital forum to connect a wider community of practitioners, and gave rise to the arthistoryteachingresources.org website, which launched publicly in 2013.  Since that time, the site has had more than 400,000 hits from over 91,000 educators in K-12, post-secondary institutions, and art museums, and from academic support staff including reference librarians and curriculum designers. AHTR’s administration has similarly expanded to a leadership collective of art historians, ranging in experience from early career scholars to those well established in the field, and an advisory network assembled for expertise and leadership in art history, museum education, and digital humanities, and united by their interest in advancing pedagogical research. The unique relationship between AHPP and AHTR will allow scholars access to diverse resources about teaching and learning, including lesson plans and the AHTR Weekly on the OER, and peer-reviewed articles published in the journal.

AHPP in Digital Commons

In choosing the Digital Commons platform, AHPP is enthusiastic to extend the relationship with CUNY that was first established when AHTR was born out of the Graduate Center’s New Media Lab with support from Baruch Learning and Technology Grants.  In keeping with the site’s origins, AHTR also contracted CHIPS, a New York web development studio known for innovative work with cultural institutions including The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Timeline of Art History and 82nd and Fifth, who had redesigned the AHTR website in 2014 to create AHPP’s logo and site design.

The editors, editorial collective, and advisory board of AHPP are excited to join the Office of Library Services in the broader open access movement and for the ways in which contributions to the journal will be utilized in the fields of SoTL, art history, and beyond. AHPP worked closely with Megan Wacha (Office of Library Services) and Jill Cirasella (CUNY Graduate Center) to develop editorial policies and guidelines that are transparent to authors and readers.