Graduate Center Research Impact: Pin Drops Keep Falling on My Map!

(Déjà vu? This is a very slight reworking of a post from the Graduate Center Library blog.)

Germany. India. England. France. Canada. Poland. Iran. Sweden. China. Turkey. Netherlands. Egypt. Russia. Japan. Those are just a few of the countries where researchers are downloading the works of Graduate Center students and faculty!

Graduate Center Academic Works, the Graduate Center’s new open access institutional repository, tells us more than we ever knew before about global interest in Graduate Center research. The repository is still small — as of today, it holds just 1,125 works, primarily dissertations and master’s theses, faculty articles and other faculty works, and technical reports from the Computer Science program. But its reach is already broad — those 1,125 works have been accessed 31,349 times…and counting! (See the 10 most downloaded items.)

And now we can all watch what’s being downloaded where by visiting the repository’s animated download map (also visible on the bottom of the main GC Academic Works page)!

Map showing some of the downloads from Academic Works on March 11, 2015
Map showing some of the downloads from Academic Works on March 11, 2015

Furthermore, anyone with one or more items in Academic Works receives monthly readership reports with information about how much their works have been accessed. It’s never been easier to track the popularity and impact of your work, or to reach audiences you otherwise wouldn’t have reached — largely through Google and Google Scholar searches.

Lots of East Coast downloads on March 11!
Lots of East Coast downloads on March 11!

GC-affiliated faculty, want to improve the readership and impact of your work? Submit your scholarly and creative works — articles, book contributions, conference presentations, slideshows, posters, data sets, etc. Submitting is as simple as completing a form — see the step-by-step instructions.

Want to raise the profile of your program? Talk to your colleagues about uploading their works as well! Or invite Jill Cirasella, Associate Librarian for Public Services and Scholarly Communication, to a meeting to give an explanation and demonstration of Academic Works.

Want to improve the visibility of your center or institute? Contact Jill Cirasella to inquire about creating an Academic Works section for your center or institute!

A download in Seychelles!
A download in Seychelles!

(Graduate Center students, we’re doing a phased launch and are not accepting student works other than dissertations and theses quite yet. But stay tuned because we will in the near future!)

Have questions? Not sure which publishers allow you to upload copies of your articles? Want to get some one-on-one instruction before you begin? Contact Jill Cirasella — she’s happy to help by email, over the phone, or in person.

March Workshops at GC: Authors’ Rights and Why & How to Submit to Academic Works

This month, the Graduate Center Library is offering two workshops of potential interest to readers of Open Access @ CUNY:

You Know What You Write, But Do You Know Your Rights? Understanding and Protecting Your Rights as an Author
Tuesday, March 10 @ 2:30-4:00pm
Open to the GC and broader CUNY community: Click to RSVP

When you publish a journal article, you sign a copyright agreement. Do you know what you’re agreeing to when you sign it? Different journals have different policies: Some journals require you to relinquish your copyright. (You then have to ask permission or even pay to share your article with students and colleagues!) Some journals allow you to retain some rights (e.g., the right to post online). Some journals leave copyright in your hands. (You simply give the journal a non-exclusive license to publish the article.)

How can you find out a journal’s policy? How can you negotiate your contract to make the most of your rights as a scholar, researcher, and author? Come learn how to preserve your rights to reproduce, distribute, and display the work you create.

Led by Jill Cirasella, Associate Librarian for Public Services and Scholarly Communication at the Graduate Center. Open to students, faculty, staff, and anyone from the CUNY community who has questions about their rights as authors, open access publishing, or scholarly communication.

Can’t make it? Want a preview of what’s covered? See the materials from the previous authors’ rights event.

Grad Center Faculty Workshop: Why & How to Submit to Academic Works
Tuesday, March 17 @ 2:30-4:00pm
Open to GC and CUNY doctoral faculty and research assistants only: Click to RSVP

The Graduate Center recently launched Graduate Center Academic Works, an open access institutional repository that is the ideal way for faculty to make articles, book chapters, data, etc. available to their research community and the broader public. It’s also the perfect place to satisfy grant funders’ open access requirements!

You might wonder, “Are researchers allowed to make their scholarly journal articles freely available online?” Very often, the answer is yes: a majority of journal publishers allow self-archiving of this kind! (To find the policy of a specific publisher or journal, check SHERPA/RoMEO.)

This workshop will introduce faculty to Academic Works, present the many compelling reasons to post works there, and provide step-by-step instructions for uploading works.

(Graduate students, we apologize, but we’re not ready for you quite yet. We’re doing a phased launch, and the repository is currently only ready to accept faculty self-submissions. But it will be open to student self-submissions in the near future!)

Led by Jill Cirasella, Associate Librarian for Public Services and Scholarly Communication.

Can’t make it? Contact Jill at jcirasella@gc.cuny.edu for a one-on-one instruction to Academic Works.

CUNY Advance Start-Up, Greenhouse, and Scale Up Grants

CUNY Advance Start-Up, Greenhouse, and Scale Up Grants Call for Proposals

Applications Due March 23, 2015 at 5:00 p.m.

Program Description
CUNY Advance supports campus-based innovations and projects that have transformative potential across the University. The campuses oversee the initiative through a subcommittee of the Council of Presidents, with guidance from leading thinkers on instructional technology at the University.

Our pilot projects so far have included supporting a high-enrollment undergraduate chemistry course to create a hybrid, flipped-classroom and the creation of Science Forward, a new undergraduate science course focused on scientific literacy that features an open educational resource (OER) video library.

In 2015-16 we seek to support new projects of varied scope, focus, and function through a competitive process open to CUNY faculty and staff.
Winning proposals will have a well-defined agenda for addressing a specific need within CUNY and supporting student success. Projects might include course creation or adaptation for hybrid, web-enhanced, or online delivery; new approaches to student services such as advisement; piloting and supporting new pedagogical methods; and more.

Projects supported by CUNY Advance will be developed under the leadership of the proposing party, but benefit from access to a project management and instructional design team.

Funding for awards may include release time (or equivalent, such as summer salary or non-teaching adjunct hours); consultation with an instructional technology fellow (ITF), specialized assessment and institutional researchers, technical and coding experts; and project management. Specific awards and award periods will vary with the scope and goals of individual projects. All grant recipients will participate in an annual symposium and are strongly encouraged to pursue publication opportunities. Please note that all local campus and department guidelines for reassigned time, along with PSC workload reporting rules, will be observed. Awardees will be responsible for obtaining necessary permissions.
CUNY Advance has three categories of awards.

  1. Startup Grants
    Startup Grants are for projects that are in a conceptual or exploratory stage. Awardees will collaborate with an ITF to help shape and implement a limited proof-of-concept pilot for the project. Startup grant recipients will also participate in faculty workshops and benefit from regular interactions with other startup grant recipients to brainstorm best practices, assessment, sustainability, and future plans.

  2. Greenhouse Grants
    Greenhouse Grants are for projects that are beyond the conceptual stage and are already established as pilot projects. Greenhouse Grant funding allows the project to grow beyond its home base, through strategic partnerships that might include other departments, campuses, cultural or community based organizations, the Department of Education or the private sector. Greenhouse Grant recipients will benefit from an ITF project coordinator and project management services from the CUNY Advance staff. At the Greenhouse stage, special attention will be paid to assessment, scale, and sustainability.

  3. Scale-up Grants
    Projects that have had successful proof-of-concept and show promise for more widespread adoption will receive support to grow across CUNY. The CUNY Advance project team will work with the project leads to coordinate logistics, digital infrastructure, professional development, and other needs of scale-up.
    About Instructional Technology Fellows
    Instructional Technology Fellows (ITFs) are CUNY doctoral candidates and/or post-docs from a wide range of disciplines who have expertise in pedagogical applications of technology. ITFs typically work one-on-one with faculty members to articulate goals and integrate digital projects, train faculty and students in using tools, and promote a culture of innovation on campuses. ITFs are selected by a competitive application process overseen by leading thinkers on academic technology at CUNY.

Application Procedures
All applications must be submitted electronically at https://cunyadvance.commons.gc.cuny.edu/application/. Applications are due on March 23, 2015 at 5:00 p.m. Some finalists may be invited to give oral presentations at a later time. We expect to announce awards in late spring.
Each application must include:

  1. Name, campus, and contact information
  2. Project title
  3. Type of award requested
  4. A single PDF with the following:

    • Primary contact name, email and project title
    • Project narrative (max 500 words) that explains your goals and how support from CUNY Advance would benefit the project.
    • Anticipated needs, such as personnel with specific technical skills.
    • Proposed timeline and/or workflow, including your projected deliverables at 3 months, 6 months, 1 years, and 2 years (as applicable).
    • Simple budget
    • Statement of any prior and/or ongoing funding (if applicable)

For questions, please contact Lisa Brundage, Director, CUNY Advance via this form.