CopyrightX for Copyright A-Z

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You probably know your copyright ABCs already. But what about your UVWs and XYZs? If you want to read and learn a lot (and I mean a lot) about US copyright history, theory, statutes, case law, and open questions — as well as just enough about international copyright law to begin to understand how complex things can get — then I highly recommend CopyrightX, a 12-week course offered through Harvard Law School, HarvardX, and the Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society. I took it last spring and found it hugely intellectually stimulating. It’s also very demanding (at least for those who embrace the opportunity and fully engage), but not on your wallet: the course and course materials are completely free of charge. If this sounds like an appealing challenge to you, then you might want to apply for a spot in the Spring 2019 course.

Here’s the official announcement:

Join CopyrightX 2019: Applications due December 7

CopyrightX is a twelve-week networked course, offered from January to May each year under the auspices of Harvard Law School, the HarvardX distance-learning initiative, and the Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society. The course explores the current law of copyright and the ongoing debates concerning how that law should be reformed.

Through a combination of pre-recorded lectures, assigned readings, weekly seminars, live webcasts, and online discussions, participants in the course examine and assess the ways in which law seeks to stimulate and regulate creative expression.

Hundreds of students from all over the world, ages 13 and up, have taken part in this remote course since 2013!

Learn more and submit your application

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Editor’s Choice: Impact of Social Sciences – Predatory publishers threaten to consume public research funds and undermine national academic systems – the case of Brazil

Impact of Social Sciences – Predatory publishers threaten to consume public research funds and undermine national academic systems – the case of Brazil

Excerpt:

“An unintended consequence of the open access movement, predatory publishers have appeared in many countries, offering authors a quick and easy route to publication in exchange for a fee and usually without any apparent peer review or quality control. Using a large database of publications, Marcelo S. Perlin, Takeyoshi Imasato and Denis Borenstein analyse the extent of this problem throughout the entire Brazilian academic system. While predatory publications remain a small proportion of the overall literature, this proportion has grown exponentially in recent years, with both early-career and established scholars found to have authored papers published in predatory venues. The inclusion of predatory publications in national journal quality rankings has been a key factor in this increase…”

“A disturbing side effect of this new publishing environment is the emergence of so-called “predatory publishers”. An unintended consequence of the OA movement, predatory publishers have appeared in many countries, offering quick and easy publication in exchange for a fee, usually without any apparent peer review or quality control. Although concerns have been raised over predatory journals, these are often accounts based on experience of a limited number of journals, or research studies limited to a specific subject.”

Read the full article: http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/impactofsocialsciences/2018/09/06/predatory-publishers-threaten-to-consume-public-research-funds-and-undermine-national-academic-systems-the-case-of-brazil/

Editor’s Choice: New to OA? Top tips from the experts | Unlocking Research

Source: New to OA? Top tips from the experts | Unlocking Research

Excerpt:

We have a fantastic community in the Scholarly Communication space. And this is one of the clear themes that emerged from a recent exchange on the UKCORR discussion list. The grandly named UK Council of Research Repositories is a self-organised, volunteer, independent body for repository managers, administrators and staff in the UK.

The main activity for UKCORR is a closed email list which has 570 members and is very active. Questions and discussions range from queries about how to interpret specific points of OA policy through to technical advice about repositories.

Recently, the OSC’s Arthur Smith (the current Secretary of UKCORR), posed the first ‘monthly discussion’ point, asking the group two questions:

  • What do you wish you were told before you started your job in repository management/scholarly communication?
  • What are your top three tips for someone just starting?

What followed was a flurry of emails full of great advice. Too good not to share – hence this blog. In summary:

  1. This is a varied and complex area
  2. Open access is bigger than mandates
  3. Things change fast in scholarly communication
  4. Don’t panic
  5. Work with your academic colleagues
  6. The OA community is strong and supportive

Read the full blog post: https://unlockingresearch-blog.lib.cam.ac.uk/?p=2134

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