Author Archives: Megan Wacha

CUNY Joins Nationwide OER Degree Program

Today, Achieving the Dream launches a major OER degree initiative to support student learning and degree completion through the use of openly licensed learning materials. I’m very excited to announce that CUNY’s Borough of Manhattan Community College, Bronx Community College, and Hostos Community College are among the 38 participating community colleges thanks to the vision and leadership of Marsha Clark and Ann Fiddler in the Office of Library Services, along with colleagues throughout CUNY Libraries. The full press release from Achieving the Dream  is reprinted below.

 Achieving the Dream Launches Major National Initiative to Help 38 Community Colleges in 13 States Develop New Degree Programs Using Open Educational Resources

OER Degree Initiative will accelerate use of openly licensed learning materials in higher education and cut costs to students while improving degree and certificate completion

SAN FRANCISCO—June 14, 2016—The national community college reform network Achieving the Dream (ATD) today announced the largest initiative of its kind to develop degree programs using high quality open educational resources (OER). The initiative—which involves 38 community colleges in 13 states (see attached list of participating colleges)—is designed to help remove financial roadblocks that can derail students’ progress and to spur other changes in teaching and learning and course design that will increase the likelihood of degree and certificate completion.

The annual costs of textbooks are about $1,300 per year for a full-time community college student and amount to about a third of the cost of an Associate’s degree. This cost, research shows, is a significant barrier to college completion. Students who don’t complete college are over 50 percent more likely than those who graduated to cite textbook costs as a major financial barrier, according to a study by the research firm Public Agenda.

Equally important, using digital and interactive open educational resources such as open courseware will encourage faculty to teach students in more engaging and dynamic ways and invite students to become more actively involved in their own learning. The initiative’s requirement to create entire degree programs using OER also will trigger a careful re-examination of course content and sequencing to build up-to-date, cohesive degree programs. These degrees will be available to a minimum of 76,000 students over a three-year period.

The effort is intended to spark more rapid adoption of OER within higher education, beginning with community colleges. Today, there are enough open educational materials to replace textbooks in required courses in four two-year programs: business administration, general education, natural or general science, and social science. But only a few colleges are using those resources. There is also a significant body of OER in computer science.

The OER Degree Initiative will create a library of high-quality, digital, open courses available to other institutions and the public at large. Making resources easily available to all is expected to encourage OER adoption even at non-participating institutions.

A Culture Change
“This initiative will help further transform teaching and learning in the nation’s community colleges,” said Dr. Karen A. Stout, President and CEO of Achieving the Dream. “ Extensive use of OER will enable students to have access to more dynamic learning tools and a richer academic experience at a cost that will help more students complete their studies.”
Achieving the Dream recently unveiled a new approach to improving student success and completion that helps colleges develop institutional capacities essential to implementing sweeping initiatives like OER degrees. Leading the OER Degree initiative will allow ATD and the participating colleges to expand their understanding of impactful teaching and learning across entire degree programs.

“Through the OER Degree Initiative, these community colleges are simultaneously addressing two important challenges faced by educators and students: Not only will they provide their faculty the flexibility and academic freedom to align their open educational resources to curriculum objectives, but also, by lowering textbook costs, they will make it far more likely that their students will achieve the goal of attaining a degree,” said Barbara Chow, education program director at the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation.“
Colleges involved in the effort will need to integrate OER into their course redesign processes and update professional development to prepare instructors to use open, digital content most effectively,” said David Wiley, an international expert on OER and Chief Academic Officer of Lumen Learning, a key partner in the initiative. “Over the next three years, colleges will create systems and structures that better connect curriculum and pedagogy to what students need to learn to be successful in academic disciplines and the workplace.”

The $9.8 million in funding for the initiative comes from a consortium of investors that includes the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Great Lakes Higher Education Guaranty Corporation, the Shelter Hill Foundation, and the Speedwell Foundation.

Results of Previous Efforts
Colleges and states that have introduced OER initiatives have already seen significant results.

“Some of Virginia’s community colleges have led the way in using OER content exclusively,” says Glenn DuBois, chancellor of Virginia’s community college system. “Studies of our institutions have shown that OER reduces costs and contributes to better grades, higher course completion rates, and faster degree completion.”

Tidewater Community college, for example, was the first community college to adopt an open educational resources degree which enables students to complete a two-year degree in business administration with no textbook costs. Tidewater’s “Z-Degree” program has experienced high student satisfaction levels, improved student retention, and an estimated 25 percent reduction in college costs for students (tuition and books).

Northern Virginia Community College’s pilot OER courses have increased pass rates by nine percent compared to non-OER courses.

A recent multi-school study found that students using OER took an average fall semester credit load of 13.3, compared to 11.1 credits for students using traditional books. If this holds, students using OER would complete their degrees a full year earlier for a 60 credit-hour degree.

How the Initiative Will Work
ATD will help colleges make OER degrees critical elements of their student success efforts. Lumen Learning will provide technical assistance; SRI International will evaluate the initiative and conduct research on how OER degrees impact student success and the institutions providing them; and the Community College Consortium of Open Educational Resources (CCCOER) will facilitate a community of practice.

At the completion of the Initiative, all approved OER courses will be available through a comprehensive, easily accessible online platform.

Achieving the Dream will serve as initiative intermediary, managing grants to all the institutions, overseeing implementation, and ensuring programmatic fidelity. ATD will monitor college progress, provide guidance on change management and institutional transformation, and assure effective integration of OER Degree partner support and guidance.

Achieving the Dream, Inc. is a national nonprofit that is dedicated to helping more community college students, particularly low-income students and students of color, stay in school and earn a college certificate or degree.

Colleges Participating in the OER Degree Initiative
Colleges and systems were selected through a competitive grant process based on their ability and capacity to implement OER degree programs, offer the full complement of degree courses quickly, or quickly scale the number of sections offered.

State Institutions
AZ (1) Pima Community College
CA (2) Santa Ana College
West Hills College Lemoore
CT (1) Housatonic Community College
FL (2) Broward College
Florida State College at Jacksonville 
MA (1) Bunker Hill Community College
MD (1) Montgomery College Foundation
MI (1) Bay College
MN (3) Distance Minnesota Consortium (Alexandria Technical and Community College, Northland Community and Technical College, Northwest Tech )
NY (9) CUNY Consortium (Borough of Manhattan Community College, Bronx Community College, Hostos Community College)
SUNY Consortium (Clinton Community College, Herkimer Community College, Mohawk Valley Community College, Monroe Community College, Tompkins Cortland Community College)
NC (1) Forsyth Technical Community College
TX (8) Odessa College
Texas Consortium: Alamo Colleges (Northeast Lakeview College, Northwest Vista College, Palo Alto College, San Antonio College, St. Philip’s College), Austin Community College, San Jacinto Community College, El Paso Community College
VA (6) Virginia Community College Consortium (Central Virginia Community College, Germanna Community College, Lord Fairfax Community College, Mountain Empire Community College, Northern Virginia Community College, Tidewater Community College)
WA (2) Lake Washington Institute of Technology
Pierce College

Achieving the Dream, Inc. is a national nonprofit that is dedicated to helping more community college students, particularly low-income students and students of color, stay in school and earn a college certificate or degree. Evidence-based, student-centered, and built on the values of equity and excellence, Achieving the Dream is closing achievement gaps and accelerating student success nationwide by: 1) guiding evidence-based institutional improvement, 2) leading policy change, 3) generating knowledge, and 4) engaging the public. Conceived as an initiative in 2004 by Lumina Foundation and seven founding partner organizations, today, Achieving the Dream is leading the most comprehensive non-governmental reform network for student success in higher education history. With over 200 institutions, more than 100 coaches and advisors, and 15 state policy teams – working throughout 35 states and the District of Columbia – the Achieving the Dream National Reform Network helps more than 4 million community college students have a better chance of realizing greater economic opportunity and achieving their dreams.

Art History Pedagogy and Practice launches in Digital Commons

Art History Teaching Resources (AHTR), in partnership with the Office of Library Services, is excited to announce the launch of Art History Pedagogy and Practice (AHPP) on Academic Works’ Digital Commons platform. Published by AHTR, a practitioner-led open educational resource for educators who address art history, visual, and material culture, AHPP is the first academic journal dedicated to the scholarship of teaching and learning in art history (SoTL-AH). The result of a two year initiative, AHPP responds to a long-standing need to advance, collect, disseminate, and demonstrate pedagogical research specific to the discipline. The CFP  for the inaugural issue, forthcoming in Fall 2016, is available on the AHTR website.

SoTL in Art History

AHPP results from a two year initiative that sought to examine the ways in which art historians devote time, effort, and energy to classroom teaching, curriculum development, and student engagement. Generously funded by the Samuel H. Kress Foundation, AHTR began preliminary research in 2015, which included a field-wide survey conducted by Randi Korn and Associates and a literature review assessing existing pedagogical scholarship in art history. These findings were synthesized in a White Paper  that demonstrated the need for SoTL-AH to be acknowledged as a legitimate area of intellectual inquiry by the institutions and communities encompassing academic art history. As a peer-reviewed journal devoted to SoTL-AH, AHPP will facilitate this process by providing scholars a forum to share research on pedagogical topics, and by encouraging further academic investigation and discourse around teaching and learning in art history

AHTR

AHPP builds on the success of AHTR as a platform to exchange ideas related to pedagogy in art history.  Founded on dual goals to raise the value of the academic labor of teaching and to provide peer support across ranks of tenured, tenure-track, and contingent instructors, AHTR began as a collaboration between Michelle Millar Fisher at the Graduate Center and Karen Shelby at Baruch College in 2011. Fisher, then a Graduate Teaching Fellow with a background in museum education, and Shelby, then an Assistant Professor of Art History, organized meetings where colleagues shared teaching materials and experiences. These gatherings suggested potential for a digital forum to connect a wider community of practitioners, and gave rise to the arthistoryteachingresources.org website, which launched publicly in 2013.  Since that time, the site has had more than 400,000 hits from over 91,000 educators in K-12, post-secondary institutions, and art museums, and from academic support staff including reference librarians and curriculum designers. AHTR’s administration has similarly expanded to a leadership collective of art historians, ranging in experience from early career scholars to those well established in the field, and an advisory network assembled for expertise and leadership in art history, museum education, and digital humanities, and united by their interest in advancing pedagogical research. The unique relationship between AHPP and AHTR will allow scholars access to diverse resources about teaching and learning, including lesson plans and the AHTR Weekly on the OER, and peer-reviewed articles published in the journal.

AHPP in Digital Commons

In choosing the Digital Commons platform, AHPP is enthusiastic to extend the relationship with CUNY that was first established when AHTR was born out of the Graduate Center’s New Media Lab with support from Baruch Learning and Technology Grants.  In keeping with the site’s origins, AHTR also contracted CHIPS, a New York web development studio known for innovative work with cultural institutions including The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Timeline of Art History and 82nd and Fifth, who had redesigned the AHTR website in 2014 to create AHPP’s logo and site design.

The editors, editorial collective, and advisory board of AHPP are excited to join the Office of Library Services in the broader open access movement and for the ways in which contributions to the journal will be utilized in the fields of SoTL, art history, and beyond. AHPP worked closely with Megan Wacha (Office of Library Services) and Jill Cirasella (CUNY Graduate Center) to develop editorial policies and guidelines that are transparent to authors and readers.

Public scholarship for the public good – but who is the Public?

Open access advocates, myself included, often talk about public scholarship for the public good. Open access advances the pace of scientific progress, promotes interdisciplinary research and collaborations, and allows researchers to share their work with those who don’t otherwise have access to it. We’ve all had the experience of hitting a paywall, and it’s not hard to believe that members of our local and global communities do too.

The Budapest Open Access Initiative, regarded as one of three declarations that defined and shaped the movement, establishes the public good as the foundation for open access:

An old tradition and a new technology have converged to make possible an unprecedented public good. The old tradition is the willingness of scientists and scholars to publish the fruits of their research in scholarly journals without payment, for the sake of inquiry and knowledge. The new technology is the internet. The public good they make possible is the world-wide electronic distribution of the peer-reviewed journal literature and completely free and unrestricted access to it by all scientists, scholars, teachers, students, and other curious minds. Removing access barriers to this literature will . . . lay the foundation for uniting humanity in a common intellectual conversation and quest for knowledge.

But who is the Public? How do open access repositories like CUNY Academic Works benefit them? We want to know!

The Office of Library Services at the CUNY Central Office recently set-up a new feature in Academic Works: a feedback form. PDF cover pages in select series now include a question: How does access to this work benefit you? Let us know!Readers that click the hyperlink are directed to a feedback form that asks for some basic information as well as permission to publicly share their comments.

Before rolling it out across the repository, this feature was tested on a collection of dissertations at the Graduate Center. Monthly usage reports let us know this content gets a lot of attention, but who is downloading and reading it? How does it contribute to the public good? I can’t tell you about each download, but I can now tell you how open, public access to “The Contributions of Earl “Bud” Powell to the Modern Jazz Style” benefit one person:

I am a 52 year old engineer who has been playing jazz piano since the age of 10. I am delighted to find this thesis about one of the most important jazz pianists of the 20th century. It includes the *incredible* transcription of “Strictly Confidential,” an amazing piano piece by legendary jazz pianist Bud Powell. I have been looking for a transcription for this piece my entire life, as it is far too complicated for me to hear with my basic ears…

This is the first of what I expect to be many stories that demonstrate the benefits of open access to the public. Future feedback will be posted to this blog when permissions allow.

Why submit to CUNY Academic Works? John Jay’s Jeffrey Kroessler shares his story.

This guest post originally appeared as “CUNY Academic Works: Get your work out there!” in the Fall 2015 Newsletter of the Lloyd Sealy Library at John Jay College of Criminal Justice.

In 2014 I published “Bombing for Justice: Urban Terrorism in New York City from the 1960s through the 1980s” in Criminal Justice and Law Enforcement Annual: Global Perspectives, a volume edited by Chief Librarian Larry Sullivan. How can you find this article? The answer is: you cannot. It exists only as a chapter in that book and is not indexed in any databases. Only a half dozen libraries have it on their shelves. Unless it is there you won’t know to search for it. How frustrating! All that research, inaccessible.

Enter CUNY Academic Works. I created an account and uploaded the piece. Now, entering the search terms terrorism, New York, and FALN in Google brings up the article. What had been locked away is now findable and citable, and the work can now join the scholarly discussion already in progress. Furthermore, everything entered into Academic Works can be accessed through OneSearch, the Library’s new search tool.

We assume that all our publications are captured by digital searches, but that is not the case. For American history, the primary database is America History and Life. If an article is not indexed there, it may as well not exist. My 2011 article in the Long Island History Journal, “Brooklyn’s Thirst, Long Island’s Water: Consolidation, Local Control, and the Aquifer,” is not in that database. Uploading it to Academic Works will greatly enhance the likelihood that researchers will find it. In addition, I uploaded a PowerPoint presentation to Academic Works on the same topic.

To reach a wider audience, faculty should submit their book chapters, research in progress, and presentations to this institutional repository. After all, publishing is pointless unless it finds readers.

Jeffrey Kroessler

Open Access @ CUNY IT Conference 2015

The City University of New York’s 14th Annual IT Conference is happening tomorrow and Friday, and I couldn’t be more excited to attend and participate. While many of the sessions are of interest to open access advocates, I thought it’d be helpful to identify those sessions that specifically focus on open access here at CUNY — and there are a lot of them! (Did I miss one? Add it in the comments!) Check out the conference website for descriptions of all the great sessions happening over the next two days.

Thursday, December 3rd, 2:15P

Digital Preservation: You Built It, But Can We Preserve It?
Despite the ease of creation, the web is ephemeral. The fleeting nature of websites present a challenge to repositories when a record needs to be preserved. The Graduate Center Library was recently presented with this challenge with the increase of submissions of online components to dissertations. This session will focus on the need to capture a snapshot, the limitations of current normative practices and some alternative approaches.

Friday, December 4th, 9:30A

Technical and Conceptual Challenges of Developing the CUNY Digital History Archive (CDHA)
This roundtable explores the process of creating a democratically produced digital archive on CUNY’s rich history. Presenters will describe the CDHA’s evolution and the decision to customize the Omeka web tool for the archive’s backend and online display. The presenters, which includes historical contributors, the Omeka programmer, lead scholar, archivist and project director, will demonstrate CDHA online collections and discuss the technical and conceptual challenges involved in archiving CUNY’s history.

From Blog Posts to a Peer-Reviewed Journal: Art History Pedagogy and Practice
Art History Teaching Resources (AHTR), a peer-supported CUNY faculty initiative, is developing Art History Pedagogy and Practice (AHPP), an e-journal devoted to scholarship of teaching and learning in art history that responds to the lack of pedagogical research in the discipline. This session will outline the process of building an open-access platform to advance, collect, disseminate and foster academic consideration of pedagogical practice and its scholarly value.

Friday, December 4th, 1:00P

Merging the Digital and the Experiential in Science Forward
In Science Forward, a CUNY-built scientific literacy course, students experience projects and digital materials that build community and contextualize the place of science in their lives. Presenters will highlight both field work and digital tools that make Science Forward a unique, accessible and necessary innovation. Presenters will give hands-on demonstrations of tools, examples of projects and discuss how other disciplines can develop opportunities that meld experiential learning and digital platforms.

Lowering Costs, Increasing Engagement: Open Source Online Readers in History
The History Department at Bronx Community College developed an in-house, open-access online primary source reader for its World History course. We edited nearly 100 sources and created an ePortfolio website for them. The website improves student learning by reducing barriers of access to documents and making documents portable. It continues to evolve to suit faculty who use it to increase student participation and to develop new metacognitive strategies.

Building and Crowdsourcing Faculty Resources with Open Educational Resources (OERs)
It can be difficult to efficiently convey expectations for a course to new teachers – especially adjuncts who often only have a few weeks (or days) to get acquainted with a syllabus before their first class. This session will discuss the benefits of using a simple, well-organized website to provide course material, how to strike a balance between standardization and academic freedom and opportunities for collaboration and crowdsourcing.

Friday, December 4th, 2:15P

Opening CUNY: Academic Works at Work
Academic Works, CUNY’s new open access institutional repository, collects and provides public access to the scholarly and creative works produced by CUNY faculty, students and staff. This program will show how opening content to the world impacts CUNY, as each speaker addresses collections at their institution: dissertations at The Graduate Center, Open Educational Resources at Brooklyn College, the “Save Hostos” archival collection at Hostos Community College and faculty research from across CUNY.

City Tech’s OpenLab: Community Innovation and Integration
This panel showcases recent OpenLab community-building innovations: faculty-generated repositories for General Education assignments and Open Educational Resources; First-Year Learning Communities’ shared spaces for interaction among faculty, students and peer mentors; The Buzz student blog for discussion and community building among students; and a usability study that surveys faculty engagement and recommends best practices. Presenters will highlight the OpenLab’s new mobile-friendly design and future initiatives, including cohort-based projects and collaborations across CUNY.

Open Trails

Back in November of 2011, the CUNY University Faculty Senate passed a Statement and Resolution on Open Access – a resolution which supported the establishment of a CUNY-wide open access institutional repository and which has been a guiding document in the development of that repository, from its collections policies to its mission and goals:

CUNY Academic Works is a service of the CUNY Libraries dedicated to collecting and providing access to the research, scholarship and creative work of the City University of New York. In service to CUNY’s mission as a public university, content in Academic Works is freely available to all.

CUNY Academic Works aims to:

  • Provide centralized, public access to the scholarly and creative output of the students, faculty, and staff of the City University of New York.
  • Promote research and collaboration within and between the twenty-four campuses that make up the City University of New York, as well as the larger public.
  • Preserve the history and development of the City University of New York.

While the mission and goals of Academic Works are clearly stated, it’s understandable that the first steps to meeting them can feel a little uncertain. Therefore, in order to support the Libraries as we embark on the trail to a more open CUNY, the Office of Library Services communicated three actionable goals for our first 18 months:

  • In 6 months, 50% of institutions will have at least one collection in the repository
  • In 12 months, 100% of institutions will have at least one collection in the repository
  • In 18 months, CUNY Academic Works will have 15,000 items representing diverse content types and disciplines

Sound familiar? OLS has been busy getting the word out about Academic Works since the kick-off this March, and, less than four months later, CUNY Libraries has met its first goal. In fact, we passed it. Thanks to the commitment and hard work of CUNY librarians, eighteen (count ’em, 18!) of twenty-four institutions have their first collections in the repository within four months. And these initial collections have us well on our way to meeting the 18 month goal; they include 2,500+ items spanning from traditional journal publications and monographs to data sets, student work, open educational resources, and archival collections that capture the history of the University.

CUNY enters the scholarly communication landscape at an exciting time. It’s a time that some find reminiscent of the wild west (and it certainly has its good, its bad, and its ugly), but it’s also a time in which CUNY has the opportunity to pioneer the way.

CUNY Libraries prepare to enter the wild west of academic publishing.

CUNY Libraries prepare to enter the wild west of academic publishing. Eighteen of the campus libraries are trained and ready to go, with more on the way soon!

This post originally appeared on What’s New @ OLS57, which provides CUNY Libraries with news and updates from the Systems group at the CUNY Office of Library Services.

Demystifying Altmetrics & the Search for Quality

Making your work publicly accessible impacts how that work is read and used. Join the LACUNY Scholarly Communications Roundtable for a discussion about:

  • evaluating scholarly publication quality (from disciplinary considerations to predatory publishing),
  • assessing impact with traditional and altmetrics*, and
  • creating scholar/researcher profiles with services such as ORCID.

Thursday, May 7, 2015
2-4pm
Graduate Center Rm 9205
Snacks provided, RSVP: http://bit.ly/altmetrics-rsvp
Twitter hashtag: #cunyaltmetrics

Presenters:

Monica Berger is Electronic Resources and Technical Services Librarian at New York City College of Technology, CUNY. She is an Associate Professor and her scholarly and professional activities focus on scholarly communications and popular culture.

Marta Bladek
is Freshman and Instruction Services Librarian at John Jay College. A few years ago, with Kathleen Collins, she created a Faculty Research Resources libguide that introduced the JJ community to measures of scholarly impact, including altmetrics. In addition to maintaining the guide, Marta prepared workshops for JJ faculty and the college-wide Personnel Committee, published a Scholarly Communication column in the C&RL News, and wrote about Bibliometrics Services and the Academic Library for College and Undergraduate Libraries.

Margaret (Meg) Smith is the Physical Sciences Librarian at NYU. She has co-created a scholarly metrics research guide and workshop at NYU and teaches a variety of metrics- and data-related workshops at the CUNY Grad Center Library. She also teaches data librarianship for the Pratt Institute’s School of Information and Library Science.

*For background on altmetrics, visit ACRL’s Keeping up with . . . Altmetrics.

Knowledge Made Public: Open Access. Humanities. Social Sciences.

The Graduate Center Library is pleased to host a presentation on open access in the humanities and social sciences from Rebecca Kennison and Lisa Norberg of K|N Consultants. Kennison and Norberg will discuss the Open Access Network, a model for academic publishing based on revised partnerships between scholarly societies, academic libraries, and publishers. Martin Burke (The Graduate Center, CUNY), Jessie Daniels (The Graduate Center, CUNY), and Ken Wissoker (Duke University Press & The Graduate Center, CUNY) will respond, opening up lively conversation about the future of scholarly communication.

From K|N

We started the Open Access Network to help disciplines in the humanities and social sciences transition to an open access environment because we believe in the humanities, we believe in the social sciences, and we believe in scholarly societies and the university presses that support the work of humanists and social scientists. They all matter. We also believe the research and scholarship these scholars produce have broad societal value and deserve a wide audience. That matters, too. Please join us for a conversation on a transformative solution for sustainable OA publishing and archiving.

Tuesday, May 5th
2:30pm – 4:00pm
Room 9206
The Graduate Center
365 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY 10016
RSVP requested

About the speakers

Rebecca Kennison, the K of K|N, is one of the two Principals at K|N Consultants. Prior to working full time at K|N, she was the founding director of the Center for Digital Research and Scholarship, a division of the Columbia University Libraries/Information Services, where for nearly 8 years she was responsible for developing programs to facilitate scholarly research and the communication of that research through technology solutions. Rebecca has worked primarily in the scholarly publishing industry, including production leadership roles at Cell Press, Blackwell Publishing (now Wiley-Blackwell), and the open-access publisher Public Library of Science (PLOS).

Lisa Norberg is a Principal at K|N Consultants, providing strategic and operational guidance via a range of consultation services to academic and research libraries, scholarly societies, and other organizations. She has over 20 years of experience in academic librarianship, having held positions at Barnard College, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Penn State Harrisburg, and George Mason University. She is an adjunct faculty member at Pratt Institute’s School of Information and Library Science, where she teaches a course on strategic leadership. She is interested in organizational transformation in academic libraries, the evolving role of librarians in teaching and learning, and the libraries’ role in an open-access scholarly information ecosystem.

About the responders

Martin J. Burke is an Associate Professor of History and American Studies at the City University of New York. He earned an A.B. in History from the City College, and an M.A. and Ph.D. in American Studies from the University of Michigan. He has been an Exchange Fellow at the Institute for Irish Studies at Queen’s University, Belfast; a Fulbright Junior Lecturer at the University of Florence; and a Fulbright Senior Lecturer at the National University of Ireland, Galway. In addition, he has lectured at Helsinki University, the University of Verona and the Van Leer Jerusalem Institute. He has held research fellowships at the American Antiquarian Society, the Library Company of Philadelphia, Notre Dame University and the New York Historical Society.

Jessie Daniels is Professor of Public Health, Sociology and Critical Psychology at Hunter College and the Graduate Center. An internationally recognized expert on Internet manifestations of racism, she is the author of two books about race and various forms of media, White Lies (Routledge, 1997) and Cyber Racism (Rowman & Littlefield, 2009), as well as dozens of peer-reviewed articles in journals such as New Media & Society, Gender & Society, American Journal of Public Health, and Women’s Studies Quarterly.She directs JustPublics@365, a project whose goal is to connect academics, journalists and activists in ways that foster transformation on issues of social justice.

Ken Wissoker is the Editorial Director of Duke University Press, acquiring books in across the humanities, arts, and social sciences. He’s especially known for lists in anthropology, cultural studies, race, post-colonial theory, feminism, queer theory, affect theory, science studies, popular music, and photography. He joined the Press as an Acquisitions Editor in 1991; became Editor-in-Chief in 1997; and was named Editorial Director in 2005. This fall, in addition to his duties at the Press, he became Director of Intellectual Publics at The Graduate Center, CUNY. He lectures and publishes widely on questions of interdisciplinarity and publishing.

Everything You Wanted to Know But Were Afraid to Ask . . . About CUNY’s New Institutional Repository Platform

The LACUNY Scholarly Communications Roundtable (SCRT) invites you to a presentation on Academic Works, CUNY’s new institutional repository, with speakers Megan Wacha and Jill Cirasella. Hear about exciting plans and progress made by CUNY’s new Scholarly Communications Librarian, and learn about the Graduate Center’s implementation of their local instance. Leave with ideas about how to rock your campus with Academic Works.

Friday, February 20
3pm-5pm
Graduate Center, Room 9205
RSVP requested by Thursday, February 12
Snacks provided

SPEAKER BIOS

Jill Cirasella is the Associate Librarian for Public Services and Scholarly Communication at the Graduate Center CUNY, where she leads numerous scholarly communications initiatives, including the GC’s new institutional repository, Academic Works. Jill is a vocal advocate of open access and seeks to promote understanding and adoption of open access at CUNY and beyond.

Megan Wacha is CUNY’s new Scholarly Communications Librarian. Prior to joining CUNY in January 2015, Megan was a research and instruction librarian at Barnard College, where she instigated for information access by promoting Columbia’s institutional repository, organizing Wikipedia edit-a-thons, among other activities.

For further information please contact the LACUNY SCRT co-chairs Jean Amaral (jamaral@bmcc.cuny.edu) and Karen Okamoto (kokamoto@jjay.cuny.edu).