Category Archives: Events

Event Announcement: Open Access in Latin America & the Case of CLACSO-REDALYC

The LACUNY Scholarly Communications Round Table and METRO’s OPEN SIG present an opportunity to hear from leaders of the Latin American OA movement about what’s happening in Iberoamerica and their view on global OA.

Dr. Dominique Babini & Dr. Arianna Becerril will talk about the new partnership between between CLACSO and Redalyc.org (www.clacso.redalyc.org) to further efforts to bring Latin American open access resources together. CLACSO-REDALYC provides APC-free OA social science journals from Iberoamerican countries with a platform for visibility, open access, indexing and indicators for authors, institutions, and countries. The platform already has 793 peer-reviewed journals with 294,437 articles in open access.

Our speakers will be participating remotely via webinar. We’ve arranged an in-person viewing at METRO and we hope you’ll join us there! If you wish to join via webinar, there are limited ”seats” so be sure to register in advance, and please check with colleagues in your organization to arrange participating together.

Open Access in Latin America & the Case of CLACSO-REDALYC
Tuesday, May 31, 2016
4 p.m. – 6 p.m.
Event Description and registration: http://metro.org/events/753/

About the Presenters:

Dominique Babini (Argentina) is coordinator of open access scholarly communications projects, research and advocacy at CLACSO, a network of 432 research institutions in 26 countries, mainly in Latin America. Open access scholarly communications researcher at the University of Buenos Aires. Latin America contributor at UNESCO´s Global Open Access Portal, and member of the Experts Committee of the Argentine National System of Digital Repositories; Doctorate in political science and postgraduate in information science.

Arianna Becerril is co-founder and director of technology and innovation at Redalyc. She is also a PhD candidate in Computer Science at the Tecnologico de Monterrey in Mexico, and a professor and researcher on the Faculty of Political and Social Sciences at the Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México, where her research addresses bibliometrics, design and development of metadata repositories, open access and interoperability standards. Becerril is a member of the International Advisory Board of the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) and co-founder of Red Mexicana de Repositorios Institucionales (REMERI).

This is the first event in the Global Open Access Webinar Series jointly sponsored by METROs OPEN SIG and LACUNY Scholarly Communications Round Table.

Event Announcement: “Publish Don’t Perish: Authors’ Rights When Authors Write”

Your research is central to your career and the advancement of knowledge in your field, but do you know your rights to what you write? Join librarians Liz Jardine (LaGuardia) and Megan Wacha (CUNY OLS) as they discuss how faculty can publish in the journals they want to publish in and still keep their rights. Topics will include: how to find and evaluate a journal to publish your work, reading and negotiating contracts, and how to distribute your work so it can have maximum impact.

When: 10 – 11:30AM on Thursday, May 12th
Where: Library Classroom, E101-B (campus map)

This event is open to all CUNY Faculty. To RSVP (or for more information), please contact Catherine Stern castern@lagcc.cuny.edu or Liz Jardine ejardine@lagcc.cuny.edu

Sponsors: LaGuardia Library Workshop Planning Committee & CUNY Office of Library Services

publish-dont-perish-poster-final

Open Access @ CUNY IT Conference 2015

The City University of New York’s 14th Annual IT Conference is happening tomorrow and Friday, and I couldn’t be more excited to attend and participate. While many of the sessions are of interest to open access advocates, I thought it’d be helpful to identify those sessions that specifically focus on open access here at CUNY — and there are a lot of them! (Did I miss one? Add it in the comments!) Check out the conference website for descriptions of all the great sessions happening over the next two days.

Thursday, December 3rd, 2:15P

Digital Preservation: You Built It, But Can We Preserve It?
Despite the ease of creation, the web is ephemeral. The fleeting nature of websites present a challenge to repositories when a record needs to be preserved. The Graduate Center Library was recently presented with this challenge with the increase of submissions of online components to dissertations. This session will focus on the need to capture a snapshot, the limitations of current normative practices and some alternative approaches.

Friday, December 4th, 9:30A

Technical and Conceptual Challenges of Developing the CUNY Digital History Archive (CDHA)
This roundtable explores the process of creating a democratically produced digital archive on CUNY’s rich history. Presenters will describe the CDHA’s evolution and the decision to customize the Omeka web tool for the archive’s backend and online display. The presenters, which includes historical contributors, the Omeka programmer, lead scholar, archivist and project director, will demonstrate CDHA online collections and discuss the technical and conceptual challenges involved in archiving CUNY’s history.

From Blog Posts to a Peer-Reviewed Journal: Art History Pedagogy and Practice
Art History Teaching Resources (AHTR), a peer-supported CUNY faculty initiative, is developing Art History Pedagogy and Practice (AHPP), an e-journal devoted to scholarship of teaching and learning in art history that responds to the lack of pedagogical research in the discipline. This session will outline the process of building an open-access platform to advance, collect, disseminate and foster academic consideration of pedagogical practice and its scholarly value.

Friday, December 4th, 1:00P

Merging the Digital and the Experiential in Science Forward
In Science Forward, a CUNY-built scientific literacy course, students experience projects and digital materials that build community and contextualize the place of science in their lives. Presenters will highlight both field work and digital tools that make Science Forward a unique, accessible and necessary innovation. Presenters will give hands-on demonstrations of tools, examples of projects and discuss how other disciplines can develop opportunities that meld experiential learning and digital platforms.

Lowering Costs, Increasing Engagement: Open Source Online Readers in History
The History Department at Bronx Community College developed an in-house, open-access online primary source reader for its World History course. We edited nearly 100 sources and created an ePortfolio website for them. The website improves student learning by reducing barriers of access to documents and making documents portable. It continues to evolve to suit faculty who use it to increase student participation and to develop new metacognitive strategies.

Building and Crowdsourcing Faculty Resources with Open Educational Resources (OERs)
It can be difficult to efficiently convey expectations for a course to new teachers – especially adjuncts who often only have a few weeks (or days) to get acquainted with a syllabus before their first class. This session will discuss the benefits of using a simple, well-organized website to provide course material, how to strike a balance between standardization and academic freedom and opportunities for collaboration and crowdsourcing.

Friday, December 4th, 2:15P

Opening CUNY: Academic Works at Work
Academic Works, CUNY’s new open access institutional repository, collects and provides public access to the scholarly and creative works produced by CUNY faculty, students and staff. This program will show how opening content to the world impacts CUNY, as each speaker addresses collections at their institution: dissertations at The Graduate Center, Open Educational Resources at Brooklyn College, the “Save Hostos” archival collection at Hostos Community College and faculty research from across CUNY.

City Tech’s OpenLab: Community Innovation and Integration
This panel showcases recent OpenLab community-building innovations: faculty-generated repositories for General Education assignments and Open Educational Resources; First-Year Learning Communities’ shared spaces for interaction among faculty, students and peer mentors; The Buzz student blog for discussion and community building among students; and a usability study that surveys faculty engagement and recommends best practices. Presenters will highlight the OpenLab’s new mobile-friendly design and future initiatives, including cohort-based projects and collaborations across CUNY.

It’s Open Access Week! Nay, Open Access Month! What Now?

(This post is a slight reworking of a post from the Graduate Center Library blog.)

This week, October 19-25, is International Open Access Week, an annual opportunity for students, faculty, and other researchers to learn about open access (OA) to scholarly literature, find out how to make their works OA, and help make OA the new norm in scholarship and research. (Read more about Open Access Week and about OA in general.)

Of course, CUNY is a very big place, and we like to think big. So here at CUNY, it’s not just Open Access Week but Open Access Month: Numerous CUNY librarians are making a point to promote understanding, acceptance, and adoption of OA alllll monnnnnth looooong. (Actually, we’re always happy to talk about OA — any day, any week, any month, any year!)

During Open Access Week/Month, you might hear about open access from many sources:

Once Open Access Week/Month has whetted your appetite for OA, join the Graduate Center Library for workshops addressing two key aspects of OA: Does my publisher allow me to share my work (i.e., make it OA)? And if so, how and where am I allowed to share it?

Find out the answers to these and other questions at the following workshops, each offered twice — click the links to learn more and RSVP (non-GC folks are welcome to attend too!):

And it’s not just the Graduate Center Library that’s offering workshops! See the calendar of CUNY events for Open Access Month and its aftermath (scroll to the bottom of the page to see the calendar) and avail yourself of an event on your campus or a campus that’s convenient for you!

International Open Access Week image

Graphic is adapted from this image, © Dimitar Poposki, used under a Creative Commons Attribution license.

OA MONTH – Events at CUNY

OCTOBER 14th
Using Open Educational Resources in the classroom: a panel discussion (panel at City Tech)

OCTOBER 20th
Open Scholarship Matters! (panel at City Tech)

OCTOBER 21st
Internet’s Own Boy (screening at City Tech)

OCTOBER 22nd
Internet’s Own Boy (screening at City Tech)

OCTOBER 23rd

CUNY Academic Works Workshop: Increase the Reach of your Research

Workshop Leaders: Prof. Megan Wacha, Scholarly Communications Librarian Office of Library Services  And  Prof. Jill Cirasella, Associate Librarian for Public Services and Scholarly Communication, Graduate Center Library

Location: The Graduate Center.  Room C196.03 (concourse level inside the library);  Time: 2:30-4:00; Please RSVP by October 20th to Alexandra de Luise at alexandra.deLuise@qc .cuny.edu

OCTOBER 27th

Who Owns Your Journal Article: You or the Publisher?  (6:30-8:00 pm Graduate Center)

October 28th

Who Owns Your Journal Article: You or the Publisher? ( 1:00 – 2:30 pm Graduate Center)

November 2nd

Leveraging Open Ed Resources in the Classroom and Beyond: an OER Panel Discussion (METRO and ACRL/NY)

NOVEMBER 5th
Academic Works: Repository for Lehman Scholarship and Creative Work (Information session at Lehman College)

October is Open Access Month

The LACUNY Scholarly Communications Roundtable has organized resources to support events at CUNY Libraries  planned for Open Access Week (October 19 – 25) and throughout the month of October. The Roundtable decided that CUNY Libraries might want to use the whole month of October to raise awareness of Open Access on our campuses. This is a great time to spread the word about CUNY Academic Works (and to educate faculty on Authors’ Rights, Creative Commons, etc.)

A great resource for event-planning and keeping track of what’s happening on CUNY campuses is the OA / OER Toolkit compiled by members of the Roundtable. Check out the Calendar of CUNY Events,  as well as ideas for events and publicity.

We will also post events on this Blog (see next post) if you send the information to us. And you can post your event on the Academic Commons Scholarly Communications Roundtable as well as OAWeek.org and CULIBS.

Keep your eyes on this space and the Academic Commons Scholarly Communications Roundtable for news about  CUNY Academic Works that you can publicize on your campuses.

Let’s hear about your publicity ideas and events!

–Madeline Cohen [madeline.cohen@lehman.cuny.edu] and Jean Amaral [ jamaral@bmcc.cuny.edu ], Co-Chairs, LACUNY Scholarly Communications Roundtab

Demystifying Altmetrics & the Search for Quality

Making your work publicly accessible impacts how that work is read and used. Join the LACUNY Scholarly Communications Roundtable for a discussion about:

  • evaluating scholarly publication quality (from disciplinary considerations to predatory publishing),
  • assessing impact with traditional and altmetrics*, and
  • creating scholar/researcher profiles with services such as ORCID.

Thursday, May 7, 2015
2-4pm
Graduate Center Rm 9205
Snacks provided, RSVP: http://bit.ly/altmetrics-rsvp
Twitter hashtag: #cunyaltmetrics

Presenters:

Monica Berger is Electronic Resources and Technical Services Librarian at New York City College of Technology, CUNY. She is an Associate Professor and her scholarly and professional activities focus on scholarly communications and popular culture.

Marta Bladek
is Freshman and Instruction Services Librarian at John Jay College. A few years ago, with Kathleen Collins, she created a Faculty Research Resources libguide that introduced the JJ community to measures of scholarly impact, including altmetrics. In addition to maintaining the guide, Marta prepared workshops for JJ faculty and the college-wide Personnel Committee, published a Scholarly Communication column in the C&RL News, and wrote about Bibliometrics Services and the Academic Library for College and Undergraduate Libraries.

Margaret (Meg) Smith is the Physical Sciences Librarian at NYU. She has co-created a scholarly metrics research guide and workshop at NYU and teaches a variety of metrics- and data-related workshops at the CUNY Grad Center Library. She also teaches data librarianship for the Pratt Institute’s School of Information and Library Science.

*For background on altmetrics, visit ACRL’s Keeping up with . . . Altmetrics.

Knowledge Made Public: Open Access. Humanities. Social Sciences.

The Graduate Center Library is pleased to host a presentation on open access in the humanities and social sciences from Rebecca Kennison and Lisa Norberg of K|N Consultants. Kennison and Norberg will discuss the Open Access Network, a model for academic publishing based on revised partnerships between scholarly societies, academic libraries, and publishers. Martin Burke (The Graduate Center, CUNY), Jessie Daniels (The Graduate Center, CUNY), and Ken Wissoker (Duke University Press & The Graduate Center, CUNY) will respond, opening up lively conversation about the future of scholarly communication.

From K|N

We started the Open Access Network to help disciplines in the humanities and social sciences transition to an open access environment because we believe in the humanities, we believe in the social sciences, and we believe in scholarly societies and the university presses that support the work of humanists and social scientists. They all matter. We also believe the research and scholarship these scholars produce have broad societal value and deserve a wide audience. That matters, too. Please join us for a conversation on a transformative solution for sustainable OA publishing and archiving.

Tuesday, May 5th
2:30pm – 4:00pm
Room 9206
The Graduate Center
365 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY 10016
RSVP requested

About the speakers

Rebecca Kennison, the K of K|N, is one of the two Principals at K|N Consultants. Prior to working full time at K|N, she was the founding director of the Center for Digital Research and Scholarship, a division of the Columbia University Libraries/Information Services, where for nearly 8 years she was responsible for developing programs to facilitate scholarly research and the communication of that research through technology solutions. Rebecca has worked primarily in the scholarly publishing industry, including production leadership roles at Cell Press, Blackwell Publishing (now Wiley-Blackwell), and the open-access publisher Public Library of Science (PLOS).

Lisa Norberg is a Principal at K|N Consultants, providing strategic and operational guidance via a range of consultation services to academic and research libraries, scholarly societies, and other organizations. She has over 20 years of experience in academic librarianship, having held positions at Barnard College, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Penn State Harrisburg, and George Mason University. She is an adjunct faculty member at Pratt Institute’s School of Information and Library Science, where she teaches a course on strategic leadership. She is interested in organizational transformation in academic libraries, the evolving role of librarians in teaching and learning, and the libraries’ role in an open-access scholarly information ecosystem.

About the responders

Martin J. Burke is an Associate Professor of History and American Studies at the City University of New York. He earned an A.B. in History from the City College, and an M.A. and Ph.D. in American Studies from the University of Michigan. He has been an Exchange Fellow at the Institute for Irish Studies at Queen’s University, Belfast; a Fulbright Junior Lecturer at the University of Florence; and a Fulbright Senior Lecturer at the National University of Ireland, Galway. In addition, he has lectured at Helsinki University, the University of Verona and the Van Leer Jerusalem Institute. He has held research fellowships at the American Antiquarian Society, the Library Company of Philadelphia, Notre Dame University and the New York Historical Society.

Jessie Daniels is Professor of Public Health, Sociology and Critical Psychology at Hunter College and the Graduate Center. An internationally recognized expert on Internet manifestations of racism, she is the author of two books about race and various forms of media, White Lies (Routledge, 1997) and Cyber Racism (Rowman & Littlefield, 2009), as well as dozens of peer-reviewed articles in journals such as New Media & Society, Gender & Society, American Journal of Public Health, and Women’s Studies Quarterly.She directs JustPublics@365, a project whose goal is to connect academics, journalists and activists in ways that foster transformation on issues of social justice.

Ken Wissoker is the Editorial Director of Duke University Press, acquiring books in across the humanities, arts, and social sciences. He’s especially known for lists in anthropology, cultural studies, race, post-colonial theory, feminism, queer theory, affect theory, science studies, popular music, and photography. He joined the Press as an Acquisitions Editor in 1991; became Editor-in-Chief in 1997; and was named Editorial Director in 2005. This fall, in addition to his duties at the Press, he became Director of Intellectual Publics at The Graduate Center, CUNY. He lectures and publishes widely on questions of interdisciplinarity and publishing.

March Workshops at GC: Authors’ Rights and Why & How to Submit to Academic Works

This month, the Graduate Center Library is offering two workshops of potential interest to readers of Open Access @ CUNY:

You Know What You Write, But Do You Know Your Rights? Understanding and Protecting Your Rights as an Author
Tuesday, March 10 @ 2:30-4:00pm
Open to the GC and broader CUNY community: Click to RSVP

When you publish a journal article, you sign a copyright agreement. Do you know what you’re agreeing to when you sign it? Different journals have different policies: Some journals require you to relinquish your copyright. (You then have to ask permission or even pay to share your article with students and colleagues!) Some journals allow you to retain some rights (e.g., the right to post online). Some journals leave copyright in your hands. (You simply give the journal a non-exclusive license to publish the article.)

How can you find out a journal’s policy? How can you negotiate your contract to make the most of your rights as a scholar, researcher, and author? Come learn how to preserve your rights to reproduce, distribute, and display the work you create.

Led by Jill Cirasella, Associate Librarian for Public Services and Scholarly Communication at the Graduate Center. Open to students, faculty, staff, and anyone from the CUNY community who has questions about their rights as authors, open access publishing, or scholarly communication.

Can’t make it? Want a preview of what’s covered? See the materials from the previous authors’ rights event.

Grad Center Faculty Workshop: Why & How to Submit to Academic Works
Tuesday, March 17 @ 2:30-4:00pm
Open to GC and CUNY doctoral faculty and research assistants only: Click to RSVP

The Graduate Center recently launched Graduate Center Academic Works, an open access institutional repository that is the ideal way for faculty to make articles, book chapters, data, etc. available to their research community and the broader public. It’s also the perfect place to satisfy grant funders’ open access requirements!

You might wonder, “Are researchers allowed to make their scholarly journal articles freely available online?” Very often, the answer is yes: a majority of journal publishers allow self-archiving of this kind! (To find the policy of a specific publisher or journal, check SHERPA/RoMEO.)

This workshop will introduce faculty to Academic Works, present the many compelling reasons to post works there, and provide step-by-step instructions for uploading works.

(Graduate students, we apologize, but we’re not ready for you quite yet. We’re doing a phased launch, and the repository is currently only ready to accept faculty self-submissions. But it will be open to student self-submissions in the near future!)

Led by Jill Cirasella, Associate Librarian for Public Services and Scholarly Communication.

Can’t make it? Contact Jill at jcirasella@gc.cuny.edu for a one-on-one instruction to Academic Works.

Handouts from “Everything You Wanted to Know But Were Afraid to Ask . . . About CUNY’s New Institutional Repository Platform”

Maybe you weren’t able to attend last Friday’s workshop “Everything You Wanted to Know But Were Afraid to Ask . . . About CUNY’s New Institutional Repository Platform.” Or maybe you attended but lost the handouts on the subway or in the snow. Either way, here are the handouts distributed and discussed at the event:

Please take a look, share with your colleagues (and Chief Librarians!) and let us know if you have any questions!

download-map

Download Map for Graduate Center Academic Works : 1,122 papers, 25,754 downloads, and counting!