Editor’s Choice: Predatory publishing from a global south perspective by Reggie Raju

Predatory publishing is under discussion at CUNY. This article by Reggie Raju–who was a featured speaker in the LACUNY Scholarly Communications Roundtable International Webinar Series– presents viewpoints from the global south. This post was originally published in the Library Publishing Coalition Blog, Feb. 7, 2018:

Source: Predatory publishing from a global south perspective

 

Author: Reggie Raju

Abstract: The unilateral determination of a definition of predatory publishing, by Jeffrey Beall, has sent the research publishing world into a tizz. Even though Beall has withdrawn his list, unfortunately in the current technological age this list is not cleared from the web archive nor is there a prevention of the rehashing of the list by someone else. Nor, has there been subsequently an adequate reconceptualization of predatory publishing to ensure that it is not discriminatory to open access or the global south.

Writing as a Fellow of the LPC from the global south, I feel a sense of obligation to follow the call that African academics and intellectuals (not that I am either), on the continent and in the diaspora, play a role in countering the prejudice and misinformation about Africa. Be that as it may, I think there are significant lessons for both the global south and north by interrogating the concept of predatory publishing. The recently published article by Olivarez and others (2018) highlight the need for interventions to remedy the insensitive generalization of predatory publishing.

Citation: Raju, Reggie (2018). “Predatory publishing from a global south perspective.” Fellows Journal, LPC Blog. https://librarypublishing.org/predatory-publishing-global-south-perspective/

 

 

Consequences of Textbook markets moving to Access Codes (from LibraryBuzz)

access-deniedOriginally published at Library Buzz by Cailean Cooley

Student PIRGs – a powerful collective student advocacy body – has taken a prominent role in criticizing textbook publishers’ rising profit margins amid growing concern over college affordability. Its newest report focuses on textbook publishers’ shift to access codes as a strategy to maintain profit margins despite the emergence of free alternatives like open educational resources.

Here’s the full report:

Access Denied: The New Face of the Textbook Monopoly

“Access codes create a direct link between the ability to pay and the ability to get good grades.” 

More reports from Student PIRGs:

Covering the Cost – investigating the real impact of high textbook prices on today’s college students (2016)
Open Textbooks: The Billion Dollar Solution – alternative textbook model could save students a billion dollars (2015)

Source: Consequences of Textbook markets moving to Access Codes – LibraryBuzz