October is Open Access Month

The LACUNY Scholarly Communications Roundtable has organized resources to support events at CUNY Libraries  planned for Open Access Week (October 19 – 25) and throughout the month of October. The Roundtable decided that CUNY Libraries might want to use the whole month of October to raise awareness of Open Access on our campuses. This is a great time to spread the word about CUNY Academic Works (and to educate faculty on Authors’ Rights, Creative Commons, etc.)

A great resource for event-planning and keeping track of what’s happening on CUNY campuses is the OA / OER Toolkit compiled by members of the Roundtable. Check out the Calendar of CUNY Events,  as well as ideas for events and publicity.

We will also post events on this Blog (see next post) if you send the information to us. And you can post your event on the Academic Commons Scholarly Communications Roundtable as well as OAWeek.org and CULIBS.

Keep your eyes on this space and the Academic Commons Scholarly Communications Roundtable for news about  CUNY Academic Works that you can publicize on your campuses.

Let’s hear about your publicity ideas and events!

–Madeline Cohen [madeline.cohen@lehman.cuny.edu] and Jean Amaral [ jamaral@bmcc.cuny.edu ], Co-Chairs, LACUNY Scholarly Communications Roundtab

Demystifying Altmetrics & the Search for Quality

Making your work publicly accessible impacts how that work is read and used. Join the LACUNY Scholarly Communications Roundtable for a discussion about:

  • evaluating scholarly publication quality (from disciplinary considerations to predatory publishing),
  • assessing impact with traditional and altmetrics*, and
  • creating scholar/researcher profiles with services such as ORCID.

Thursday, May 7, 2015
2-4pm
Graduate Center Rm 9205
Snacks provided, RSVP: http://bit.ly/altmetrics-rsvp
Twitter hashtag: #cunyaltmetrics

Presenters:

Monica Berger is Electronic Resources and Technical Services Librarian at New York City College of Technology, CUNY. She is an Associate Professor and her scholarly and professional activities focus on scholarly communications and popular culture.

Marta Bladek
is Freshman and Instruction Services Librarian at John Jay College. A few years ago, with Kathleen Collins, she created a Faculty Research Resources libguide that introduced the JJ community to measures of scholarly impact, including altmetrics. In addition to maintaining the guide, Marta prepared workshops for JJ faculty and the college-wide Personnel Committee, published a Scholarly Communication column in the C&RL News, and wrote about Bibliometrics Services and the Academic Library for College and Undergraduate Libraries.

Margaret (Meg) Smith is the Physical Sciences Librarian at NYU. She has co-created a scholarly metrics research guide and workshop at NYU and teaches a variety of metrics- and data-related workshops at the CUNY Grad Center Library. She also teaches data librarianship for the Pratt Institute’s School of Information and Library Science.

*For background on altmetrics, visit ACRL’s Keeping up with . . . Altmetrics.

Knowledge Made Public: Open Access. Humanities. Social Sciences.

The Graduate Center Library is pleased to host a presentation on open access in the humanities and social sciences from Rebecca Kennison and Lisa Norberg of K|N Consultants. Kennison and Norberg will discuss the Open Access Network, a model for academic publishing based on revised partnerships between scholarly societies, academic libraries, and publishers. Martin Burke (The Graduate Center, CUNY), Jessie Daniels (The Graduate Center, CUNY), and Ken Wissoker (Duke University Press & The Graduate Center, CUNY) will respond, opening up lively conversation about the future of scholarly communication.

From K|N

We started the Open Access Network to help disciplines in the humanities and social sciences transition to an open access environment because we believe in the humanities, we believe in the social sciences, and we believe in scholarly societies and the university presses that support the work of humanists and social scientists. They all matter. We also believe the research and scholarship these scholars produce have broad societal value and deserve a wide audience. That matters, too. Please join us for a conversation on a transformative solution for sustainable OA publishing and archiving.

Tuesday, May 5th
2:30pm – 4:00pm
Room 9206
The Graduate Center
365 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY 10016
RSVP requested

About the speakers

Rebecca Kennison, the K of K|N, is one of the two Principals at K|N Consultants. Prior to working full time at K|N, she was the founding director of the Center for Digital Research and Scholarship, a division of the Columbia University Libraries/Information Services, where for nearly 8 years she was responsible for developing programs to facilitate scholarly research and the communication of that research through technology solutions. Rebecca has worked primarily in the scholarly publishing industry, including production leadership roles at Cell Press, Blackwell Publishing (now Wiley-Blackwell), and the open-access publisher Public Library of Science (PLOS).

Lisa Norberg is a Principal at K|N Consultants, providing strategic and operational guidance via a range of consultation services to academic and research libraries, scholarly societies, and other organizations. She has over 20 years of experience in academic librarianship, having held positions at Barnard College, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Penn State Harrisburg, and George Mason University. She is an adjunct faculty member at Pratt Institute’s School of Information and Library Science, where she teaches a course on strategic leadership. She is interested in organizational transformation in academic libraries, the evolving role of librarians in teaching and learning, and the libraries’ role in an open-access scholarly information ecosystem.

About the responders

Martin J. Burke is an Associate Professor of History and American Studies at the City University of New York. He earned an A.B. in History from the City College, and an M.A. and Ph.D. in American Studies from the University of Michigan. He has been an Exchange Fellow at the Institute for Irish Studies at Queen’s University, Belfast; a Fulbright Junior Lecturer at the University of Florence; and a Fulbright Senior Lecturer at the National University of Ireland, Galway. In addition, he has lectured at Helsinki University, the University of Verona and the Van Leer Jerusalem Institute. He has held research fellowships at the American Antiquarian Society, the Library Company of Philadelphia, Notre Dame University and the New York Historical Society.

Jessie Daniels is Professor of Public Health, Sociology and Critical Psychology at Hunter College and the Graduate Center. An internationally recognized expert on Internet manifestations of racism, she is the author of two books about race and various forms of media, White Lies (Routledge, 1997) and Cyber Racism (Rowman & Littlefield, 2009), as well as dozens of peer-reviewed articles in journals such as New Media & Society, Gender & Society, American Journal of Public Health, and Women’s Studies Quarterly.She directs JustPublics@365, a project whose goal is to connect academics, journalists and activists in ways that foster transformation on issues of social justice.

Ken Wissoker is the Editorial Director of Duke University Press, acquiring books in across the humanities, arts, and social sciences. He’s especially known for lists in anthropology, cultural studies, race, post-colonial theory, feminism, queer theory, affect theory, science studies, popular music, and photography. He joined the Press as an Acquisitions Editor in 1991; became Editor-in-Chief in 1997; and was named Editorial Director in 2005. This fall, in addition to his duties at the Press, he became Director of Intellectual Publics at The Graduate Center, CUNY. He lectures and publishes widely on questions of interdisciplinarity and publishing.